Category Archives: Business

The New Wave of Business Cards

Business cards, in essence, are simply a way to exchange information with another person. They are tangible items that someone can refer to for future use. Although the functionality of the business card is simple, the execution of it is anything but. Many companies have realized that like any other marketing activity, a business card is an extension of a brand’s image and perception. It is the first glance into the company’s persona. Here at BurdgeCooper, we have seen an influx of unique designs, interesting layouts and intensive printing processes to create these specialized business cards. Here are a few trends.

Color On the Rim

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Multicolor

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Black Emboss

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Unique Layouts

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BurdgeCooper allows for your company or client to be creative. With our extensive list of cost-effective printing processes and our unmatched expertise, we can help you achieve the look and feel that you are looking for. For a full list of our services, visit www.BurdgeCooper.com/process.

The Next Trade Fight: Office Paper

Four Companies and Union Allege Dumping by China, Indonesia, Brazil, Portugal and Australia

Four U.S. paper manufacturers allege that five countries are dumping uncoated paper on the U.S. market, including the kind used for computer printers. PHOTO: MICHAEL RUBENSTIEN FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Four U.S. paper manufacturers allege that five countries are dumping uncoated paper on the U.S. market, including the kind used for computer printers. PHOTO: MICHAEL RUBENSTIEN FOR THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Four paper manufacturers and the United Steelworkers union are asking the U.S. government to impose duties on imports of office paper that they say are priced unfairly low.

Their claim, due to be filed with the U.S. Commerce Department on Wednesday, alleges that rivals in China, Indonesia, Brazil, Portugal and Australia are dumping certain types of uncoated paper on the U.S. market, including that used for such things as computer printers, book publishing, junk mail and envelopes.

Dumping involves selling at prices deemed less than “fair value,” which can mean below the price in the exporter’s home country or less than the cost of production plus a reasonable profit.

The companies also say producers in China and Indonesia are benefiting from government subsidies that allow them to reduce prices.

The U.S. market for the type of uncoated paper involved in the complaint is estimated at $4.5 billion a year, according to Domtar Corp. , one of the companies calling for duties. In the first nine months of last year, imports of such paper from the five countries named were up 40% from a year earlier, even though U.S. demand for it is declining, the companies say.

Imports of such paper accounted for more than 16% of the U.S. market in last year’s first 11 months, said Chip Dillon, a partner at Vertical Research Partners in New York, up from 12.7% a year earlier. As U.S. paper makers have retired old plants, he said, importers have rushed in.

The Commerce Department and the U.S. International Trade Commission will have up to about 14 months to determine whether trade laws have been violated, U.S. producers have been harmed and duties should be levied on the imports.

Over the past 15 years, U.S. paper makers have persuaded the government to put duties on a variety of products from China and other countries, including tissue paper and some coated paper.

The Commerce Department generally has taken a tougher stance against Chinese exporters in dumping disputes in recent years, said William Perry, a partner at law firm Dorsey & Whitney in Seattle. Mr. Perry, who often represents importers in trade cases, said the trend is worsening trade tensions with China, provoking more retaliation. “We’re throwing a rock; they’re throwing a rock back,” he said.

In addition to Domtar, the companies filing the latest complaint are Packaging Corp. of America, Lake Forest, Ill.; Finch Paper LLC, Glens Falls, N.Y., and P.H. Glatfelter Co. , York, Pa.

International Paper Co. , Memphis, Tenn., declined to participate, a spokesman said. He said the company manufactures in 10 countries and relies on the flexibility of a global network.

The steelworkers union, which represents about 130,000 paper, pulp and forestry workers in the U.S. and Canada, said eight U.S. paper mills that made uncoated paper have closed or curtailed operations since 2011, eliminating thousands of jobs. Domtar, a Montreal-based company that makes paper in the U.S. and Canada, plans to convert a paper production line in Ashdown, Ark., from uncoated paper to fluff pulp, used in diapers.

“These jobs are too valuable to let go to people who aren’t following the same set of rules we are,” said Jon Geenen, the union’s international vice president.

The U.S. market for uncoated paper has been shrinking 3% to 4% annually in recent years as more documents are handled electronically and companies shave costs, said Mike Garcia, president of Domtar’s pulp-and-paper division. He said the market appeared likely to continue contracting gradually in the next few years but should eventually level off.

U.S. imports of uncoated paper in rolls or sheets, a broader category than covered by the trade petition, totaled $2.71 billion in last year’s first 11 months, while exports came to $1.05 billion, according to Global Trade Information Services.

From The Wall Street Journal, by James R. Hagerty. 

Common misconceptions about print

Most of our sales and customer service representative (CSR) teams are print industry veterans, and they’ve seen and heard it all. Part of our philosophy at BurdgeCooper is education – helping to make everyone better print purchasers, whether or not you’re a customer. I asked them what some common misconceptions people make about our company, and it came down to two items: production time and our size/capabilities/products.

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Rosina Motta is Woman of the Year!

 

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Rosina Motta, a customer sales representative here, was recently honored by the Los Angeles chapter of the National Association of Professional Women (NAPW) as Woman of the Year! The NAPW VIP Women of the Year are selected in recognition of the strides they have made in their respective industries, their outstanding leadership, their professional achievements, and for displaying the highest level of support of NAPW’s commitment to networking and community involvement.

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BurdgeCooper and The Ligature to Join Forces

The Ligature and BurdgeCooper LogosI am excited to announce that BurdgeCooper and The Ligature, two of Southern California’s most well respected specialty printers will be joining forces on February 1, 2014. Both companies are headquartered in Los Angeles and together they will create a unique printing and engraving company in both scale and manufacturing capability. The Ligature has operations in Los Angeles and Berkeley while BurdgeCooper has sales and customer service support in Atlanta and Denver. Initially, both companies will continue to operate their respective Los Angeles facilities with a plan to integrate them into The Ligature facility by the end of 2014. Continue reading

The Power of Making

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Studies confirm that tactile input had a positive effect on the evaluation of products, especially for products high in quality. In the last two years, we’ve seen a cultural shift towards “makers” – people who are handcrafting goods — ranging from shirts to dice to food — with high quality materials. The maker movement has four main philosophies:

  • If it can be imagined, it can be made.
  • A most effective step in refining/developing a thing is collaborating with others on it.
  • Begin with the end in mind.
  • Making things always combines form with function; the art of making should be appreciated and celebrated. Continue reading

Haptics: The desire to touch

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A common skeuomorph are wall coverings designed to look like stone, brick, tile, or wood – a structure is artificially given the look of materials that it used to require to make it.

Last week I introduced the topic of haptics – today, I’m going to go a little deeper into sensory marketing by introducing a new concept, skeuomorphism, and how understanding it can help your business.
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Haptics: The power of touch

The power of touch

Have you heard of haptics? The word “haptics” comes from the Greek “απτω,” meaning “I fasten onto, I touch,” and in the modern world is any form of nonverbal communication involving touch. Haptic sense provides information about surfaces and textures and is vital in interpersonal relationships in relaying intimacy. Touch is the earliest sense to develop in utero. Every culture has a set of haptics traditions, and the sense of touch is both physical and emotional.

Now that you’ve learned something new for the day… how will it be useful to you and your business? Continue reading